Marcellus Shale Documentary Project now at the Exchange

The Moose Exchange Stairwell Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition entitled Marcellus Shale Documentary Project. The exhibition includes the work of six professional photographers who share in the telling of the complex story of Marcellus Shale gas drilling in Pennsylvania. This traveling exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, April 19th, at 6 p.m. and will remain on view through June 8, 2013. Artist Talks are scheduled for Wednesday, May 1st, beginning at 5 p.m. Four of the six photographers in the exhibition will discuss the project and their individual contributions to it. The Marcellus Shale Documentary Project photographers are Noah Addis, Nina Berman, Brian Cohen, Scott Goldsmith, Lynn Johnson, and Martha Rial.

A series of related programs will take place throughout the duration of the exhibition. All events are free and open to the public, and except as noted take place in the Moose Exchange Ballroom.

More about the Marcellus Shale Documentary Project: “For the best part of a year, the photographers traveled across the Commonwealth, meeting people, listening to and recording stories, and documenting images from across the region. The exhibition represents each photographer’s aesthetic, each having chosen a different angle from which to view the subject. Together, they offer a compelling narrative that represents, they believe, an honest appraisal of how the arrival of Marcellus Shale drilling has affected communities around the Commonwealth. The validity of this work is established not by the credentials of the photographers: the fact that their work has been featured in publications such as National Geographic, LIFE, or The New York Times; or that two of them have won the Pulitzer Prize, one has been included in the Whitney Museum of American Art Biennial; or that one has a doctorate degree. Instead, it is the level of intellect, sensitivity, and skill with which they approach their work.”

For more information about the MSDP, visit the-­‐msdp.us For additional information about the exhibition at the Moose Exchange, contact Sue O’Donnell at sue.mooseexchange@gmail.com.

Friday April 19, 6 p.m.: Opening Reception for the Exhibition, with light refreshments
7:30-9 p.m.: Film Screening: “Switch”, with an introduction by Brett Mclaurin

An acclaimed agenda-free documentary, uniting diverse audiences in a shared understanding of energy and its efficiency.
www.switchenergyproject.com

Monday April 22, 7 p.m.: “The Change” with Carol French and Carolyn Knapp; Don Hess and John Hintz, moderators
Earth Day Event sponsored by Bloomsburg University’s Green Campus Initiative
A story from working dairy farmers in Bradford County who have witnessed firsthand the impacts of the gas boom on their land, their livelihoods and their communities.

Tuesday April 23, 7 p.m.: “Earth Days”, a Robert Stone film.
This 2009 documentary looks back on the modern environmental movement, including personal testimony and archival media.

Tuesday April 30, 7 p.m.: “Connecting the Dots: Marcellus Shale Players Echo Chamber”
Presentation by Dory Hippauf
From talking points to word play to politics, Dory Hippauf connects the messaging machines and echo chambers of the Natural Gas industry.

Wednesday, May 1, 5 p.m.: Artist Talks, Marcellus Shale Documentary Project
Noah Addis, Nina Berman, and Brian Cohen
Three photographers from the Marcellus Shale Documentary Project will talk about the project and their individual contributions to it.

Thursday, May 2nd, 7 p.m.: “Woods or Wells, the Ecological Impacts of Unconventional Gas Extraction”
Presented by Kevin Heatley. Note: This event takes place on B.U.’s Main Campus in Hartline Hall, Room G40; as with all of the events at the Exchange, free and open to the public.

Friday May 3, 7 p.m.: “The Good Old Boy Extraction Club”
Presentation by Wendy Lynne Lee
Few issues connect environmental integrity with social and economic justice more palpably than hydraulic fracturing. Wendy Lynne Lee with show how the latest fossil fuel gambit is really the same old boy profiteering.